This should be your reply to, "You're not like most girls"
pink-samaritan
By Rushali Pawar | 12:47 PM June 08, 2017
  • Popstar Hailee Steinfeld says why a popular compliment is actually an insult.
  • She celebrates womanhood and drives home the truth that woman indeed come in different shapes and sizes.
  • She urges women to celebrate their uniqueness and define womanhood in a manner that's peculiar to them.

 

Let’s admit it ladies, this is one of the most popular pick up lines men use to make a woman feel different and special. But beware of this. It may sound very intimate but it’s not.

When a man or anyone for that matter says, “You’re not like most girls” what they’re saying is this: “I have a narrow and limited view of womanhood and I’m using that to judge you.” And what is their narrow view of womanhood, you ask? Well, it means that women fall into type A or B category.

And this is the issue popstar Hailee Steinfeld tackles in her new and might we say catchy single, Most Girls. The singer rubbishes a statement like that because it shouldn’t even be said. No woman is the same like no man is the same.

So what should you say when someone comes at you with a head full of borrowed ideas about womanhood?

Steinfeld pretty much says the same thing and adds some colour to her argument. Her song’s lyrics celebrate women who come in different shapes and sizes, have different dreams, ambitions, lifestyles and passions. Take a look at these lyrics: "Most girls, work hard, go far, we are unstoppable/ Most girls, our fight to make every day/No two are the same."

The singer projects a party hopper, a gym addict and a geek to show that all girls are different. But here’s another secret: the gym addict could also be a party girl. She may be a boxing champion but perhaps she loves to wear floral skirts outside the rink. She puts it beautifully in these lines, "You know some days you feel so good in your own skin/
But it's okay if you wanna change the body that you came in."

Women, like men, have complex identities and perhaps it’s time we watched it emerge. Also, let’s move past stereotypes because honestly, it’s the 21st century.

 

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