kerala
By Team Asianet Newsable | 04:10 PM August 12, 2017
Organic vegetables are even more harmful for your health: Study

Highlights

  • A recent study conducted by KAU revealed that organic products are not so healthy
  • The organic vegetables and fruits were found to be contaminated with high amount of pesticides
  • Experts say that a cocktail of insecticides and fungicides are sprayed to products at close intervals


The popularity of organic food has grown dramatically, and they have a huge demand in the market. However, a recent study conducted by Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) shows that 'organic' fruits and vegetables, that we consider healthy, are not so healthy. 

In fact, organic veggies and fruits contain insecticides and fungicides, that too new generation one. What is racing alarm is the fact that these foods, that are sold at a higher price in the market, are contaminated with various pesticides including insecticides.

An 'organic' green capsicum from a major hypermarket in Ernakulam was found to have seven chemical pesticides along with five insecticides and that too in high quantities. The vegetable was purchased on June 16, 2017, and had acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, buprofezin, acephate and two fungicides, tebuconazole and iprovalicarb.

Chilli, which was even branded as 'pesticide free' was contaminated with three insecticides,  acetamiprid, metalaxyl and chlorantraniliprole, all new generation. Fruits are also not exempted. The 'red globe' grapes, which is an imported variety was found to have four pesticides, imidacloprid, metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and carbendazim.

The same trend was found in a study conducted on the vegetables and fruits obtained from a major hypermarket in Thiruvananthapuram.

The results show that a cocktail of new generation insecticides and fungicides are sprayed on the vegetables at close intervals to protect the crop, said Thomas Biju Mathew, Associate Director of Analytical Laboratory (PRRAL) of College of Agriculture, Vellayani, Thiruvananthapuram.

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